Charles Blow’s Meltdown on CNN Reflects the Black Community’s Political Immaturity

Charles Blow’s Meltdown on CNN Reflects the Black Community’s Political Immaturity
August 23 17:16 2016 Print This Article

by Yvette Carnell

Late last week Donald Trump told the truth about the worsening condition of the black community and something weird happened.

“Look at how much African American communities are suffering from Democratic control. To those I say the following: What do you have to lose by trying something new like Trump? What do you have to lose?” Trump asked during a campaign rally. “You live in your poverty, your schools are no good, you have no jobs, 58 percent of your youth is unemployed. What the hell do you have to lose?”

This was all it took for the Chattering Class of mainstream black pundits to lose their entire sh-t.

Watch New York Times columnist Charles Blow lose his mind and transform into a trollish hobglobin before our very eyes:

This one hyper-emotional response to Trump’s “what do you have to lose” comment accurately condenses the reaction of most black pundits, and far too many black voters.

Blow, an alleged serious writer at the Times, quoted The Color Purple in defense of his on-air unraveling:

Charles Blow2

 

 

The exaggeratedly offended overreaction coming from the black community seems especially curious after the Black Lives Matter protests we’ve witnessed in recent years. Put in context, here’s what it sounds like to me:

Black people to America: “You don’t understand what we go through! My black life doesn’t matter to you! My black body doesn’t matter to you!”

 

Trump: “You’re right! You don’t have money or jobs!”

 

Black people: “Racist!”

You don’t have to be a Trump supporter to understand how schizophrenic that sounds.

In comparison, here’s how we should’ve followed up Trump’s comments:  “Yes, you’re right, candidate Trump. Now tell me how your POLICY prescriptions will help the black community dig our way out of this hole.”

Trump likely would’ve failed the challenge, then we could’ve damned him for falling short on the SERIOUS question of policy rather than the EMOTIONAL overreaction at having been offended by the truth.

In a Facebook exchange, someone said, and I’m paraphrasing, “we already know Trump doesn’t have policy, so what’s the point?”

Even if you think you know what Trump is up to, make it play out politically how you NEED it to play out. What we need is a discussion about which policies are most beneficial for the black community and who, if anyone, will champion them. You don’t get to that point by overreacting at the mention of poverty in the black community. That’s an amateur move that we’ve been perfecting election after election. Isn’t it about time to bring in the clowns and get serious about our politics and our future?

view more articles

About Article Author

54 comments
wiyadonimu
wiyadonimu

great Auntie Paige found a terrific skin cream Hyundai Sonata Mixed Four door although they might a lot of part-time doing business via the internet by having a personal computer...




watch more..........>>>>>>>>>>>>>>http://www.ebiz3.com.

Erinn Watkins
Erinn Watkins

I did not like Charles Blow in this interview. He was acting very immature. Black folks, in general, don't have money or jobs. Black folks are too much into instant gratification, not financially savvy, nor do a lot of Black folks have no inclination to do anything different. It does not take anything special but a will to be different and do different than your ancestors. And while you're at it, bring a couple of folks along with you. I started when I left home to break the cycle in my family. I also brought my son and my older sister along for the ride. Not just that, everywhere I go, if anyone will listen, including young people, I share what I know.

Gusella Mariam
Gusella Mariam

There is nothing politically immature about Black Communities. Political immaturity are those Blacks 'peddlers' who are peddling this nonsense that Blacks should vote for Trump; or worse that notion that Blacks should not vote at all. Not only are these Black Trump Peddlers who peddle this BS immatiure; they are also hostile enemies of Black Communities because Black Communities are absolutely not buying their BS.

Johnw11
Johnw11

What I find interesting is how the pro-Clinton Black media trolls appear losing their minds. The fact that Trump has asked a profound question, one that they, if they're competent, should have been asking long before it ever came from Trump's mouth -- "What do Blacks have to lose?" by voting for him or someone else (for me, it's someone else -- Green Party).  Trump told the truth. And it is that truth that has shamed them, and revealed their hypocritical hustling.

Since it is true that Trump has not made one racist comment about Blacks in THIS CAMPAIGN, they've gone and drug up things he reportedly said in the past. I'm told that Sharpton (agent #CI-7) says Trump called for the death penalty of the Central Park Five about twenty years ago or so. The young Black guys were eventually exonerated. But did Trump say that before, or after, Sharpton can be seen all over the internet skinning and grinning in pictures with Trump?  Moreover, what is more significant, Trump's WORDS or the Clintons actual BEHAVIOR itself. It is well known that they ACTUALLY  executed Blacks while co-governor of the Confederate state, Arkansas: the last one, in about 1992, was considered by mental health experts to be extremely mentally ill, so much so that the prisoner asked that portions of his last meal be saved for later. Plus, during the recent primary campaign, they reaffirmed their support for the death penalty. This they did despite the fact that it is well-known that the vast majority of executed people in this country are Black, and many people have been later determined innocent while awaiting their execution dates. Some have been proven innocent after having been executed.

There are other contradictions that African Americans must stop overlooking. The Trolls and agents also falsely claim that Trump started the misguided "Birther"  movement against President Obama. While it's true that Trump was one of the pushers of that false narrative after 2009. it is equally true that the Clintons first started it in 2008, when, during the presidential campaign, they circulated pictures showing then Sen. Obama wearing Arab garb. Then, after showing the pictures, in an obvious racist and fear mongering appeal, the Clintons asked in their television ads: "who do you want answering the phone at 3 O'clock in the morning, him or me?"

They also claim that Trump "never hired Blacks" in his businesses. I don't know whether that's true or not. All I know is that the same one who said that recently, also claimed a while back that Trump is "so racist, whenever he visited his Vegas casinos, they had to hide his Black employees to keep him from seeing them." I was born at night, but not last night. Therefore, one of the two, both coming from the same mouth has to be a lie. Blacks must stop overlooking (denying) contradictions. The ability to discern, and respond to contradictions is indispensable to having what is known as "good sense."

My point is, if "Trump's a Boogieman racist" is their only selling point, based on his words allegedly made before this 2016 campaign began, how do they reconcile that with the actual racist behavior of the Clintons when they were in office? What they did to Blacks, while at the same time smiling in their face, is already well known, e.g., mass incarceration that destroyed, some experts say, well over a million Black families and lives. In fact, it wasn't just mass incarceration, the list of indecent dirt they did to Blacks is a mile long.

So how is Trump wrong for asking Blacks what do they have to lose? He is not wrong. And that's why they're upset --- the truth hurts. Moreover, these are the same ones that like to tell Blacks while trying to be smart mouthed, about the futility of "doing the same things over and again, while expecting different results." I agree. And that statement applies no where more than it does to Blacks' behavior of voting for Dems over and again for the past 50+ years and having nothing to show for it but misery and a cadre of Black semi-elites whose role is to mislead the Black collective to its doom.


rod k
rod k

You are always on point john, just let me add this. It was the clintons who started the campaign in Arkansas to keep the Confederate star's on the state flag. This Act shows the clintons mind. Instead of ridding the state flag of all resemblance of the Confederate star's and bars, they window dressed the issue and left the stars on the flag as a wink and nod to the racist in Arkansas. In every controversy about the clintons there is always a wink and nod about the truth. You can't trust this couple as far as you can spit.

Johnw11
Johnw11

@rod k  You are correct, as usual. The biggest contradiction for me is how this cadre of Black media and fake leadership trolls are still trying to convince intelligent Blacks of Trump's so-called "racist" words while ignoring the Clintons' racist misdeeds. I'm not buying it. My grandmother always told me when I was growing up that "actions speak louder than words."

Trump's message was clear: "What do you have to lose? How could I make you any worse off than you are now?"  The truth is the truth, no matter where it comes from, or who says it. That's why Blow was thrown off his game. He knows that he's pushing lies on Blacks for personal gain.  And the other hustlers, all lapping at the Dem trough, are about to lose their minds. Why? Because they're "busted," just like the role played by singer/actress J.S. in the Ron Isley music video "busted" a few years ago (LOL). They are not afraid that Blacks in mass will vote for Trump, they correctly know that's not going to happen.

Their fear is Black turn-out will be low in swing states. That's their fear. Knowing that their gravy train, and its only them feeding at the Dem gravy train -- the masses get nothing -- will be over if Blacks ("Super Predators" -- jungle animals) don't turn-out  high enough to win electoral votes in states like Ohio, etc.

Another fact that bothers me, is their arrogance. They behave as if they believe the lies their white bosses tell them -- that they are better than the rest of us. Notice how they get upset when anyone else, other than those they work for, attempt to talk to Blacks. They behave as if they're our masters. No one can talk to us without first getting permission from them, these "House Negroes" do. They rationalize and take advantage of Blacks who they know are not well informed. They say Trump didn't mean his statement because he said it to a white audience. They claim that he should speak to a Black audience. But Trump is not as crazy as some claim. He knows better than go before a Black audience filled with Clinton trolls, so they can boo and hurl insults at him, embarrassing him before the world.

Others, pure idiots, pretending to be "political analysts" claim that he was "not talking to Blacks." Well, he sure was "talking" ABOUT Blacks.

All this suffering Blacks are experiencing: Joblessness, homelessness, unsafe communities, we could go on for hours and still not cover it all. Not a word from them. Now here they come, just like J.S. --- "Didn't you get my two-way?" ... " No! Now pack your bags and call a cab, 'cause you busted."

Thanks how I see it.


KeithJohnson5
KeithJohnson5

@Johnw11 Some of your comments are indeed valid but Trump is absolutely one of the worse candidates to ever run for the Presidency. He is totally unqualified and unfit. I am a Black man and voted for Bernie. Does the Democratic party have issues, of course, but at least we have some input. Would Barack have been elected as a Republican? I sincerely doubt it. The Republicans don't do "Anything" to act like they want to include anyone, except, Old White men. Every year, they enact some type of legislation to deny our right to vote and exclude everyone who is "Different" Is that the type of party you want to be a part of?Does a person's character mean anything to you? If so, How can you justify Trump? He is Morally bankrupt and a total narcissist.   

I believe our system is broken and major reform is needed. How do we get there? A major revolution where the following takes place: 1) Citizens United is overturned. 2) Our elections are paid for by the government, no outside contributions allowed. 3) Term limits for Supreme Court justices. 4) One 8 year term for all of Congress, no more career politicians. 5) A citizens board elected to monitor and grade our elected officials on their yearly performance in Washington. (No more 4 month vacations, etc for Congress. 6) Mandatory jail terms for Corporate Bankers who embezzle their clients money. 7) Two year wait before retiring Congress person can work for a lobbyist firm.

We need to demand and get in writing before giving our support, a pledge/commitment from our candidate. They will propose and enact legislation for 2-3 issues that will help Black people. We must hold them accountable.

Johnw11
Johnw11

@KeithJohnson5  Thanks for your thoughtful reply. However, you miss my point. I do not support Trump. I support the Green Party and the facts. And one important fact is Black people are being made fools of -- by running away from someone (Trump) said to be a racist out of fear, back into the frying pan of someone whose institutional racism ACTUALLY destroyed nearly an entire generation of Blacks in the 1990s; the  effects of which are the root cause of the socio-economic problems Blacks face today. That fact cannot possibly be contradicted within the realm of reality. 

Based on your comment, Keith, you seem to be enmeshed in "lessor evil" thinking. You admit that Dems have issues, but they are, you believe, less important than Blacks having input. Actually, Blacks have no input in the Dem party either at the elected official or voting levels. If so, how does one explain Blacks' condition?

In terms of "old white men," and that kind of thing, I don't get into that. That's some of that "fake" progressive diversion. White Supremacy is a system, consisting of all ages and genders. Those lynching Blacks in the streets are not "old white men," and Sanders who I voted for is an old white man, etc.

Yes, a person's character means everything to me. That's why I will never vote for a Clinton. In fact, I agree with a Black woman who recently said that she "wouldn't vote for Clinton if ALL the prophets" told her to.

Would "Barack" ever have been elected president as a Republican? I assume you mean President Obama, that's how I address him, that's his title, and I don't know him on a personal basis. And I also assume you mean "declared GOP," since all his policy prescriptions have been GOP in nature; he is in fact a GOPer and has, subsequent to his 2012 "re-election," said so. Probably not. But Gen. Colin Powell would have. In fact, they offered the job to Powell first, but he turned it down. Those are facts -- look them up.

In terms of voter suppression, GOP folk are not passing laws to keep "Blacks" from voting, they're passing these laws to keep "Dems" from voting. And since most Blacks are Dems, that's the impact they have on Blacks. Nothing else! The racializing of it is still another ploy by propagandists and Dem party trough-feeding hustling Black semi-elites to misuse the Black collective for their own personal gain. And what about Clinton, in collusion with the media, using massive voter suppression to steal the nomination from Sanders? I am sure you must know about that. 

I agree with most of the recommendations you made. However, how in the world can you believe in them, and still vote for Clinton, because you are scared of the Boogieman, is beyond me. "Citizens United," she used the same illogic to defend her Wall-Street campaign donations as the SCOTUS used to rationalize that decision: "Campaign donations don't necessary affect a politicians' behavior in office." She said it in the debates.

You say Blacks should hold politicians accountable, I agree 100%. But how you plan to do that, when all someone has to do is instill fear in you to get your vote is also beyond me. As long as that trick is working for them, which they pull to keep from being held accountable in the first place, why should they change?

Change has to begin with you. Hint: the "Boogieman" is no more real, or evil, than the "wicked witch."


Rick Manigault
Rick Manigault

As the only Trump supporter here, I love how this debate shaping up. 


We have a warmonger who wants endless plundering across the globe.When she's not lining her pockets with money meant for blacks in the third world, she's promising the wall street criminals impunity for future fraud. Everything that's wrong with this country, and western society in general are embodied in Hillary. No way of being is more debunked than Neo-liberalism, tough on crime, interventionalist, pushing free trade:  Those policies only appeal to those who haven't had enough, or the fool hardy who think Nuclear wars have winners. 


Then you have the white nationalist , demagogue, isolationist who's policy is a kick in the face to everything that's wrong with this planet. He's an evil oligarch that's won over the hearts and mind's of poor / middle income, uneducated folks who demand more than the establishment is willing to give. Opposition to Imperialism and economic protectionism are moral, productive principles that will improve people lives across the globe.


The founder really nailed that description of Blow and many others of his lot, Political immaturity sums up every column this guy ever wrote. If you can't debate the opposition? They aren't the problem. Why can't black pastors listen to Trump? Why such hate for those who see something you don't? Blow and his pals have failed so miserably the only option they have is theatrics. Look at any of these folks on TV these days and it's frightening. Racist, misogynist or bust

docbhub
docbhub

@Rick Manigault Rick you summed up nicely why we need a third party option.  i wish the Greens and Libertarians can come together on a platform that is neither of the above you described so well that is wrong with the two major candidates. I agree that neoliberalism is just as flawed as neoconservatism was. There is another way, but I just hope that it doesn't take another cataclysmic world war before we all come up with a "new world order" that actually works.

Rick Manigault
Rick Manigault

@docbhub The Republicans have already been destroyed by this last primary, half the battle. The Dem's rejection of Hillary should have been followed by a socialist uppercut, but the centrist are thoroughly rattled. 


Greens should ditch climate hoax and gun control. Libertarians need to move left on economics. Both are superior to this weird reality show.  


Willie Daniels
Willie Daniels

where the Video? in one part of the video, I thought he said that if you support a bigot then your a bigot too to the other guy. then if he covering every Black person what called? Stereotyping

E.j. Haynes
E.j. Haynes

this may be immature of me but i live by this creed: i don't trust any black man who brushes his hair backwards. so homeboy on the right is automatically suspect from the gate. he couldn't tell me what time it is. i know...it's not the most sophisticated thing but it's tried and true for me.

Daryl Scott
Daryl Scott

With all due respect, Yvette Carnell, maturity is the term people invoke when others do not behave or speaks as someone else would have them. It is a put down, not an argument.

BreakingBrown
BreakingBrown

That's actually not THE definition of the word. It's YOUR interpretation of how I'm USING the word.--yc

Daryl Scott
Daryl Scott

Eh, I never said was I giving a definition. I was indeed talking about my interpretation of how it was being used. Races and peoples are not organic things that go through periods of development that can be usefully characterized as either immature or mature. It not only rests on an analogy to an organism but also to a comparison that never is posited and rigorously applied. How do politically mature people behave? And once mature is this a permanent state? So yeah, nothing definitional here.

BreakingBrown
BreakingBrown

I think EVERY community goes through a period of development, with stops and starts. Evolution is a real thing. And less than one hundred years outside the end of slavery--forced labor farms--I don't think asking whether we still have some growing to do is outside the realm of possibility. How do politically mature people behave? They work to move the political needle on policy as opposed to rhetoric. And nothing is a permanent state. You can devolve at any time, so can groups. --yc

Musa-Moses Ballon
Musa-Moses Ballon

BreakingBrown, What do you mean by less than 100 years outside the end of slavery? How did you come by that number?

Daryl Scott
Daryl Scott

Well, I am trying to understand how this politically mature thing works still. So were the people known as Italians today more politically mature as Romans, after their republic fell, with the rise of Italy, during fascism or since? I might ask the same question of Egyptians and the people of Mesopotamia? Are the people of Iran as mature as the Persians? Seems like politically mature people revert and become childish. Now if maturity can be loss in nations and peoples unlike individuals and animals, this might explain Trumpism.

Bruce Patrick
Bruce Patrick

"Malcolm X used to say we needed to be politically mature. Political maturity entails an understanding that just because you have Black faces in high places it doesn't mean you have progressive politics. And I say this not as someone who has any animus directed to President Obama or all the folks who are getting their invitations to the White House; or all of the folks who love and support the idea...who are really celebratory of the symbolism of President Obama. But I believe and I write this in the book Benjamin, is that all of these Democratic presidents, whether it's Obama; whether it's Clinton; or whether it's Jimmy Carter; all of them are Melvillean confidence men selling the snake oil of hope and change. That they never really fundamentally challenged the frame of American politics. And so, we have to do something dramatic; not put our faith in a Democratic Party; not put our faith in politics as usual or in some Messiah figure; but to really understand our power...individually...as communities organize on behalf of the most vulnerable...pressing and pushing for a much more progressive and radical politics." **************** From the book: "Obama reminds me of Herman Melville’s Confidence Man: he sees exactly what we want and what we fear and adjusts himself accordingly. And what Melville believed people wanted more than anything was hope, a sense of the possibility of things for themselves and for the world. I am not sure Melville understood, although he might have, the depth of that claim for black folk. For us, hope has always come with a heavy dose of realism. It couldn’t be otherwise in a world such as ours, where the color of your skin closes off certain possibilities from the moment you draw your first breath. W. E. B. Du Bois captured it best as “a hope not hopeless but unhopeful”— a blues-soaked sensibility that chastens one’s expectations of the world, because the white people in it can be so hateful and mean. In 2008 and again in 2012, Obama sold black America the snake oil of hope and change. He joined Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter, other Democratic confidence men who presented themselves as people who would challenge the racial order of things. Clinton even heralded from a place called Hope. But neither Carter nor Clinton changed the racial habits at the heart of the country. In some ways, they reinforced them. Obama promised more. Or at least we thought he did, until he told us that he wasn’t the president of black America. Maybe black people believed he represented real change. Maybe we didn’t. Maybe we needed the illusion of hope. It doesn’t matter. The reality, amid the thick fog of unmet expectations, is that very little has changed in this country. In fact, things have gotten worse. Obama is not alone in falling short of a real response. Most black liberals (elected and otherwise) have stood silently by as this economic devastation swallowed black America. Afraid to give ammunition to a boisterous ideological right and never wanting to appear disloyal to their own, they have refused to criticize the president. Instead, we have been asked to shift the blame to a recalcitrant Congress or to trust that they are working on our behalf behind closed doors. I want to expose the limits of this view of black politics— the wrongheaded idea that some leader in some back room can represent the interests of black people without any mechanism of accountability. This view of politics undermines the democratic process in black communities. Democracy in Black calls for a reimagining of black politics and a remaking of American democracy. The two are knotted together. Both begin with local grassroots organizing and movements. We’ve witnessed this in the protests and demonstrations in Ferguson, in New York, and in other cities around the country and in the Forward Together moral movement in North Carolina. They have helped free our political imaginations from the romance with President Obama that paints him as the fulfillment of our political dreams by calling attention to all the hell breaking loose around us." Glaude, Jr., Eddie S.. Democracy in Black: How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul, Crown Publishers, New York https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=TPtkABL9W94&sns=fb

Kalla Abercrombie
Kalla Abercrombie

Why would anyone be unhappy after 8 years of voting for Obama - people expected him to do so much - and solve so many problems - what was the point of Obama - was he supposed to give everyone who worshipped him $19,000 bank deposits every month - all out of love - fairness - equality - why are people still unhappy - after the intense worship of Obama

Johnw11
Johnw11

Blow's reaction is typical of a con man, used to lying and tricking the ignorant for personal gain, and then suddenly encountering a situation where his lies don't work.. His emotional reaction, and ad hominem attack -- "why's he on television?" --  was typical of "narcissistic injury": getting his feelings hurt because his hustle had been busted. All he had to do is answer a simple question "name one racist thing Trump has said about Black People" during this campaign.

He couldn't do it because, as I have noted before, Trump has not made one racist remark about Black people during his presidential campaign. Not one.

While I do not support Trump because I can't trust him, he is speaking more to the needs of Blacks than Clinton. She has not promised Blacks, or anyone else for that matter, anything of substance. This is mainly because she doesn't intend to help anyone except the rich who own her. Therefore, their only selling point is "fear."  Vote for Clinton, or the "Boogieman" (Trump) will get you. Yet Blacks have issues of an existential nature, Jobs, wealth gaps in relation to whites; unsafe poverty stricken communities, criminal justice (mass incarceration and lynchers not being arrested and punished just like from the 1870s to the 1960s); unaffordable health care where people can't receive indicated medical care because they can' afford co-pays and deductibles; education, where public school destruction will lead to only a privileged few having access to even elementary level education in a decade or so, if not sooner, on and on. Yet, all these people have to offer is the Boogieman will get you, as if Blacks are little children.

But they are worried now. They know that more than a few Blacks are beginning to see through their con games. Since Blacks are humans, it is only natural that they would eventually see the hustle for what it is -- their socio-economic suffering is reinforcing the great "coming to the senses" now being witnessed. And the likes of Blow know that if they can't increase Black voter turn-out for her, they will be fired from their media roles.  So they are worried now.

They make up stuff on the fly, e.g., "most Blacks are well-off." But even if this lie were true, which it is not, what about the millions who are not. Don't they count too, or is it only their votes that count?

But they are worried now. Oh, how they are worried. They have sent their uniformed trolls, some laid off from the primaries, back online to make fools of themselves --arguing about "children" after having voted against their own children in the primaries, and are about to do again. They talk about Trump's "racist" associations, while they themselves don't even know that they are now in coalition with the Koch Brothers and ALEC.

It's a sad situation.

rod k
rod k

Brother john, these are orwellian times. It's almost like we are living by the 1984 play book of Orwell. I just read an article in the Guardian today about how climate change has began to bring back viruses that were thought to be eradicated. In Russia they are having a outbreak of anthrax because a caribou who died 75 years ago thawed from climate change and a outbreak of anthrax began. Scientists are fearful that mosquitoes and fleas infected by viruses that were thought to be under control, will be introduced again to mankind. It's going to take funding to address this phenomenon and other public health disasters. A report came out that America doesn't have a handle on the Zika virus because it cost to much to test for it, so people could be carrying the virus and not know about it until to late. There is major concern about Zika in Gulf states as well as Florida. Puerto Rico is of major concern because it doesn't have the funding. I say this because neither political parties are willing to cut the defense budget and allocate funds to help in a oncoming crisis. That is why we as a people need to grow up politically, the stakes are much higher than any period of our existence in America.

rod k
rod k

I wish I could ignore the Zika virus but considering the last time we ignored a virus at this stage of its development, it became a worldwide phenomenon AIDS. To take the attitude that this is some kind of hoax in the era of the Internet, is a little too cavalier. I'd rather error on the side of caution, than to be blind to the consequences of mistrust. Looking at the map of Zika cases in America and around the world, one can't put their heads in the sand. Remember early AIDS victims were misdiagnosed and were treated for issues other than AIDS.

Watchful
Watchful

@rod k


l beg to differ ... remember all the hype surrounding the so-called 'ebola virus' a coupla years ago? And what became of that here in the U.S.?  Was there any widespread outbreak? I'm sure u know the answer to that one.


They luv to stir up fear and panic in the masses so they'll run out to buy whatever 'new' vaccine they've had waiting for just the right contrived 'crisis' that they've cooked up. It's all designed for the benefit of big pharma.


Anyhoo, I know at least one person who won't be fallin' for their nefarious plot(s).

docbhub
docbhub

@Watchful @rod k I beg to differ.  Ebola could have easily wiped out more 3/4 of Africa's population like the bubonic plague did to Europe's population during the middle ages. We need to pay attention to all emerging pandemics, including the small pox that decimated the native americans, which were brought over by Europeans.

Watchful
Watchful

@docbhub 


Guess u missed where I typed: "here in the U.S.?" Besides, I wasn't speaking on what "could have" happened .

Watchful
Watchful

@TinaSue 


U're more than welcome, Sistah Tina. I,too, have never, and will never, voluntarily get a flu shot or any other vaccination, for that matter. Like u, I'll trust my immune system to do it's job and will do my best in assisting it to do so.

TinaSue
TinaSue

@Watchful @rod k  Thanks for posting this very, very informative documentary.  Now, I don't feel so bad for refusing to get the "booster" shots for the childhood immunization shots I had.  My friends get every shot that's recommended; but I always refused.  Every year, they get Flu shots.  I refuse to do so.  I trusted my immune system, and I've never had the Flu or even a severe cold.  Big Pharm.

Tim Parks
Tim Parks

Vote for me and i'll set you free!!!!!!!!!!!!

Musa-Moses Ballon
Musa-Moses Ballon

RELATED TO WHAT: In my humble opinion: First of all Charles Blow blew off the question and didn't say much of anything. Secondly I would like to piggyback off of Donald Trump's statement "What do Blacks have to lose?" I would go a little further and ask "what if anything do Blacks In America owed Hillary Clinton or the Democratic Party?" For the past 7 years and 8 months there's been a democratic president in the White House and how has that benefited Blacks In America? Now before you go off on how a republican congress blocked him, let me put that question another way; "How has anything that has come out of the White House in the past nearly 8 years benefited Blacks In America?" President Barack Obama could have and should have should nominated a Black African American Female for the Supreme Court vacancy. If we're talking about women leadership in America. Before I vote for a presidential candidate, I would like some "WHY'S" answer. Respectfully submitted: Musa-Moses Ballon

Tommy Jaom
Tommy Jaom

Only thing I'd add is Jill not Hill

Kevin Smith
Kevin Smith

smh man he got to office during the biggest economic depression since the Great Depression he bailed out major companies that means WE KEPT JOBS!! in case you dont know or ever heard about LAST HIRED FIRST FIRED!! he couldn't just pick a cause for just blacks smh that would further divide country!!! this man went through hell to succeed in things he did get done!!!

Carolyn Dillon Ross
Carolyn Dillon Ross

I thought Charles was absolutely correct. We should not let them patronize us with their disingenuous bs.

Mitch Monroe
Mitch Monroe

I see it as 'it's frustrating talking to crack heads who vote for bush-cheney-trump' types.

Watchful
Watchful

I'm at a loss as to how some of y'all can actually sit and watch such worthless foolishness ... from what I can see, it's just a slight step above a minstrel act. SMH

Rick Manigault
Rick Manigault

@Watchful


Not sure if you watch sports, but this CNN spectacle is like an NFL or NBA game.  People follow and fight over the results, but it's probably all fixed. 

Watchful
Watchful

@Rick Manigault 


Ain't no probably to it, Rick. If u get a chance, check out a guy named, Brian Tuohy. He has several books out on that topic and u also may be able to find him on youtube.

Watchful
Watchful

@Rick Manigault 


Cool, Rick ... I shoulda figured u probably already knew about him. : )


 And what really gets me is how many ppl actually believe that Donaghy was somehow, just some sorta aberration or isolated case and that pro sports r all on the up n up. I mean, just how friggin naïve can one be?   SMDH